UHealth - University of Miami Health System

Ramin Shiekhattar, Ph.D.

General Information

Ramin  Shiekhattar, Ph.D.

Contact

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Languages

  • English

Roles

  • Academic Director of the Oncogenomic Core Facility
  • Chief of Division of Cancer Genomics and Epigenetics
  • Director of the Cancer Epigenetics Research Program
  • Professor, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • Professor, Dr. John T. Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics

Research Interests

My laboratory has made a number of important contributions over the past several years in identifying and characterizing critical mediators of epigenome. These include a number of chromatin remodeling (human NURF, CERF, WCRF/ACF) and chromatin modifying UTX/MLL3/4, JARID1d, LSD1-CoREST complexes. Importantly, the emerging roles for non-coding RNAs in epigenetic regulation and their crosstalk with chromatin regulatory complexes persuaded us to characterize the key players in the biogenesis and effector function of non-coding RNAs.

Visit Dr. Shiekhattar laboratory website

Publications

Biography

Dr. Ramin Shiekhattar recently joined the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine as Professor in the Departments of Human Genetics and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. He is also the Director of the Cancer Epigenetics Research Program, Chief of the Division of Cancer Genomics and Epigenetics as well as the academic Director of the Oncogenomic Core Facility. Dr. Shiekhattar obtained his Ph.D. degree from the University of Kansas and completed his postdoctoral training at UMDNJ.

 

Dr. Shiekhattar’s laboratory has made a number of important contributions over the past years in identifying and characterizing important mediators of epigenetic regulation and noncoding RNA processing that contribute to cancer development.  Importantly, laboratories’ recent work has begun to explore a class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that behave similar to transcriptional enhancers.  The laboratory is interested in deciphering the function of this class of lncRNAs in the context of relevant models of development and disease, using state of the arts genomics and proteomics approaches.  These data will be coupled with the development of novel computational methods to decipher the lncRNA “code” that helps to define the role of enhancer RNAs in development and disease.